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Rabbi Aaron Dobrzynski

January 7th, 2016 · 2 Comments

Rabbi Aaron Dobrzynski

אהרן ב"ר אליהו

Rav, Congregation B'nai Yaakov Bronx, NY

Date of Death: Sun. January 21, 1940 - Shevat 11 5700

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Cemetery:

Cemetery Details

Directions to Kever: Riverside Cemetery in Saddle Brook, NJ maintains computerized records and will provided a detailed location map upon request.

Name Listed on Cemetery Database: Name listed on marker: Rabbi Aaron Dobrzinski

Biographical Notes:

Dobrzynski Aaron Pic
Photo Caption: Rabbi Aaron Dobrzinski, Credit: Institute For Judaic Culture and History
Dobrzynski Aaron Book
Photo Caption: Title page of Pirchai Aaron authored by Rabbi Aaron Dobrzinski and published posthumous. It should be noted that this book was the personal  copy of Rabbi Dr. Leo Jung d. 1987, Credit: Institute For Judaic Culture and History
Dobrzynski Aaron Shul
Photo Caption: Congregation B’nai Yaakov at 1712 Garfield Street in the Bronx as it stands today. Credit: Google Street View

Bio Information:
The Rav was ordained by Rav Yisroel Yehoshua Trunk d. 1893 of Kutno, Poland


Credit: Moreshes Chachmei America’s Archives

Credit: Moreshes Chachmei America’s Archives

Tags: New Jersey · Riverside Cemetery - Saddle Brook · Saddle Brook, NJ

2 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Vigoda // May 26, 2016 at 1:59 am

    He was the uncle of the famous Cantor Shmuel Vigoda.
    The cantor’s father Shraga Feivish (born in Poland and lived in Hungary) was a brother in law of R Aharon.

  • 2 Vigoda // May 27, 2016 at 12:38 am

    He was born in Kutne, Poland, into a prominent Hassidic family. He studied in religious elementary school and in the synagogue study hall. He later became a disciple of the Gaon R. Yehoshuele Kutner, and from him he received rabbinical ordination. In 1900 he emigrated to the United States and became a ritual slaughterer. At the same time he studied languages and secular subject matter. He was at one time rabbi at the Bnei Yaakov school in New York. He contributed to Y. D. Ayzenshteyn’s [Judah David Eisenstein’s ten-volume] Hebrew-language encyclopedia, Otsar yisrael (Treasury of Israel), and to the Hebrew newspapers Haivri (The Jew), Hamitspe (The watch tower), and others in New York. He also wrote articles on Jewish issues and Jewish history and religion for Yidishes tageblat (Jewish daily newspaper) in New York, Der idisher vekhter (The Jewish watchman), Morgn-zhurnal (Morning journal), Der yudisher veg-vayzer (The Jewish guide), and to the English-language Jewish press. Among his books: Pirḥe aharon (Blossoms of Aharon), a collection of articles in Yiddish (54 pp.), Hebrew (42 pp.), and English (34 pp.) (Petrikov, 1928). He also published under the initials: A. D. He died in New York.

    Sources: Sh. N. Gotlib, Ahale shem (The Jewish people) (Pinsk, 1912), p. 192; Otsar yisrael (London, 1935), vols. 3, 4, 5, 7.

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