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Rabbi Chaim Hirschensohn

March 4th, 2014 · 7 Comments

Chief Rabbi Hoboken, NJ
d. 18 Elul, 1935 (5695)
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Chaim Hirschensohn

Tags: New Jersey

7 responses so far ↓

  • 1 YD Miller // Mar 5, 2014 at 12:01 pm

    Rabbi Hirschenson was a very prolific writer and orator, he wrote many seforim including; מלכי בקודש, אלה דברי הברית, ברורי המדות and many more.

    He was somewhat controversial in his philosophy and beliefs.

  • 2 YD Miller // Mar 5, 2014 at 12:22 pm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaim_Hirschensohn

  • 3 Moshe // Mar 17, 2014 at 5:36 pm

    The only rav who isn’t controversial is the one without an opinion on anything. Since such a rav doesn’t exist, this must mean that every rav is controversial.

  • 4 ישבב // Mar 26, 2014 at 3:27 pm

    Moshe, that being true, YDM is referring to a level of controversy beyond the standard.
    Actually his father in law, Rabbi Shaul Binyomin HaKohen or Radishkovitz, was also a contoversial figure.

  • 5 Hasirpad // Mar 30, 2014 at 3:12 pm

    If I recall correctly, he had another daughter (besides for the two daughters mentioned in the Wikipedia article) named Taubenhaus, whose husband was a professor in Texas (of the Tzfas Taubenhaus family).

  • 6 Hasirpad // Apr 8, 2014 at 11:33 am

    Rabbi Hirschensohn had the odd habit of calling the introductions to his sefarim “לא הקדמה ולא מבוא”:
    http://hebrewbooks.org//pdfpager.aspx?req=2976&st=&pgnum=3
    http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=2277&st=&pgnum=4

  • 7 Immanuel Lichtenstein // Jul 14, 2014 at 11:25 pm

    Avi, Tehilla Rachel’s father, was my mother. This is the remembrance that I learned from my mother.

    A significant period of Rabbi Hirschensohn’s career was in the early days of Zionism. He, Ben Yahuda, Imrie and another, whose name escapes me for the moment, were very close. (Hatikvah was written by Imrie on Avi’s table.) The other three saw Zionism largely from the Socialist point of view. Hirschensohn did not deny this goal, but he strongly insisted on the importance of religious Judaism as part of the goals of Zionism. Furthermore, although his own observance was strictly Orthodox, he saw the importance of the need for recognizing the new modern world. He delighted in the establishment of Hebrew as the secular language of Eretz. He applauded the establishment of Hebrew University. For all this he was attacked, even stoned. To be sure, his attackers were the forebearers of the current extremists. Gentle man that he was, he felt he had to leave and emigrate with his family, coming finally to America.

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